FULL CIRCLE

 

RADIANT PAVILION

IN PARTNERSHIP WITH

SOFITEL MELBOURNE ON COLLINS

& GLOBAL ART PROJECTS

2 September - 3 November 2019
Opened Friday 13 September by Sue Lorraine

Programmed in Radiant Pavilion, Contemporary Jewellery & Object Biennial 7-15 September

Supported by Sofitel Melbourne on Collins and Global Art Projects

'Full Circle' presented new work by Linda Hughes, Sim Luttin & Katrina Tyler.

 

"There are milestones in life worth celebrating, and 2019 marked twenty years since Melbourne-based jewellery artists Linda, Sim and Katrina met, underground, in the RMIT University Gold and Silversmithing studio in Melbourne. Two decades on, their studio practices are thriving, and they remain close friends and metalsmithing confidants."

WHERE WE STARTED

GET TO KNOW OUR JOURNEY

Since starting at RMIT in 1999, art jewellers Linda, Sim and Katrina have worked hard and carved their own path, developing distinctive styles that are as individual as they are rich in creative ingenuity. To date, the collections by each maker have evolved year-to-year and are unique, refined, and–most importantly–recognisably their own. Each artist has built a national and international reputation and, while their work is diverse, the women are united in creating intimate objects that are abundant in creative integrity and dynamism.

 

In September 2019, the trio presented three installations of jewellery and objects, across three spaces in the foyer of Sofitel Melbourne on Collins. Each artist developed new work that expanded their existing areas of enquiry, while considering the exhibition site and how their work interacted with each other in the space.

 

The exhibition held an additional sentimental layer of significance: the Sofitel Melbourne on Collins was the first space that Linda, Sim and Katrina exhibited in their inaugural RMIT student show. Twenty years on, it was such a privilege to present this show at the arts-loving Sofitel. It's a testament to what you can achieve with perseverance, support and industry recognition.

MOMENT(O)S OF DISQUIET AND BEAUTY

NEW WORK - SIM LUTTIN

FULL CIRCLE

 

Marking any occasion petitions a moment of time. Celebrated events enable us to take note, reflect, signify and pause the journey. Full Circle is an exhibition that marks an occasion; 20 years of making for individualistic Melbourne-based artists Linda Hughes, Sim Luttin and Katrina Tyler. Three talented jewellery artists who met in the bunkers of RMIT Gold and Silversmithing as eager students, ready to accept new challenges and no doubt, quench their thirst for knowledge from industry peers.

 

Fast forward to 2019, and after cycles of developments, countless individual journey’s and years of honing technical skills, Hughes, Luttin and Tyler commemorate their full circle. With thriving studio practises and sustained careers in the national and international jewellery community, these artists have remained close friends since 1999 and acknowledge that while their work is diverse, they “are united in creating intimate handmade objects that are abundant in creative integrity and dynamism”.[1]

 

Full Circle presents new jewellery and object works that expand each artists’ existing areas of enquiry. Installed across the foyers of Sofitel Melbourne on Collins (in cabinets and mounted on purpose-built large wall displays), each separate installation considers its site, while purposefully interacting with each other. There exists a subtle sharing of concepts cross these individual works. The industrial landscape, how we as humans engage with it and value its beauty and utility, is explored in various works. In this exhibition, we also explore the effects of time, we observe the everyday and acknowledge the unnoticed events and stories through the eyes and skills of Hughes, Luttin and Tyler.

 

Linda Hughes is an established jewellery artist. Known for her distinctive use of graphic lines and colour, she has stripped these new works of colour and concentrated on ‘projecting the line[2]’ and working exclusively in white. With this colour shift, comes a sense of lightness and self-assurance, that for me tilts a little to Mid-century modernist design.

 

Hughes explores the life of roadside marker posts in Full Circle. This new monochromatic series of laminate, wood and sterling silver brooches and pendants extends her fascination and dedication to patterning, in particular, the stripe - its history, everyday existence and utilitarian use in signs and markings. For over a decade, Hughes has been consumed by stripes and does not see a linear form or calm repeated symmetry like some, instead experiences fluid movements and reactions claiming “stripes are very noisy and demanding…the stripe is a device of agitation…stripes are the small nervous strokes of the brush within a composition – a restlessness where the surface is never still”. [3] The bold pattern of a stripe is hard to ignore.

 

Hughes enables the surface to heave with breath, creating a dynamic optical illusion onto a flat surface via the linearity of stripes. Conceptually and technically driven, Hughes’ refined and exacting skills continue to play tricks on the viewer, who perhaps expect a machine manufactured finish rather than the meticulous graphic finish from one of Melbourne’s gifted artisans.

 

Sim Luttin has established an art practice synonymous with sophistication, impeccable technical skill and contemplative surfaces. Her scale is intimate and materials reflective; silver, copper, steel, patina, photographs, sublimated aluminium and glass. Influenced by nature in her work for many years, Luttin's current interest is in exploring time-based projects that respond to the everyday.

 

Her latest series, ‘Momento(o)s of Disquiet and Beauty’ reflects her ongoing and keen observations into the everyday and unnoticed elements of the contemporary streetscapes. Drawing from recent travels to New York, Luttin elevates the unnoticed and mass-produced metalwork of the streets - the road pothole and manhole, the drain vent, the window grill – and transforms them into intimate adornment. “I encountered many circular and geometric solid and open grid constructions and began to see the beauty in the formal elements and repetition…I could visualise keepsakes that could be worn on the body serving as urban signifiers and reminders of moments past.”[4]

 

Exploring the histories and surprising handmade production methods of some of the New York metalwork[5], Luttin makes sense of these everyday objects through her conceptual reflections, research processes and experienced craftsmanship. Consisting of pendants and brooches, these new works are accompanied by a series of edition snapshot street photographs printed on sublimated aluminium. These act as part reference, part documentation but stand alone as considered photographic objects in their own right.  Photography is integral to Luttin’s developments of new objects. As a prolific photographer (on her iPhone) and commentator, she deftly draws and orders from her image library, conceiving new works and asking more questions about shared and unknown histories. Luttin’s practice plots a course through time: examining notions of ritual, personal authenticity and materiality. Her objects mark time and celebrate the periphery in Luttin’s distinctively skilful way.

 

For Katrina Tyler, it is all a matter of shifting perspectives. In continuing her explorations of material, scale and the potential of shapes, Tyler is fuelled by a familiar industrial landscape and cycles of life and time. Balance, movement and a sense of physical uncertainty are evident in this new series of playful and coloured copper and enamel wall piece, titled Industrial poise and a series of oxidised sterling silver and enamel brooches under the series title, Altered plane brooches. This new series references corrugated iron, a quintessential sign of the Australia landscape, and Tyler plays with scale and palette to personalise and reinterpret this industrialised story.

 

Living and working in Melbourne’s inner west, Tyler observes first-hand the simultaneous beauty and necessity of busy shipping and freight train yards. An evidenced technical and industrial poise indicates a sense of play and confidence in both materials and composition. By interrogating her evolving relationship to industry and commerce, Tyler has developed a visceral response to her landscape stating, “The abundance and repetition of shipping containers, all with evidence of a life of use and purpose with knocks, scrapes, repairs, a patchwork of paint…completed by a multitude of invisible hands.”[6]

 

Materials, place and scale are key considerations for any object maker. Understanding Tyler also produces large (metalwork) public sculptural works, that are often activated, provides a layer of intrigue for her audience as she continues to push new limits. Known for her exceptional technical skills, Tyler deftly combines her unique understanding of human-scale and interaction to simultaneously generate larger sculptural works, while continuing to construct her intimate jewellery works as evidenced in Full Circle.

 

For each of these diverse artists, what resonates is their subtle ability to bring to light the hidden life of things and forces that often go unnoticed. Hughes, Luttin and Tyler steadfastly explore the markings of time and the life cycles of objects affected by human interactions. These artists have firmly marked their occasion. Widely acknowledged for significant individual and collective impacts made to Australia’s contemporary jewellery scene, Hughes, Luttin and Tyler have come full circle in honouring both their craft and friendships. I can now only imagine their singular full circles spirally off and taking each to even greater heights.

 

Sarah Bond (2019)

 

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ENDNOTES
 

[1] Collective artist statement shared with author.

[2] Linda Hughes in conversation with author

[3]Linda Hughes in conversation with author.

[4] Sim Luttin in conversation with the author.

[5] Luttin’s research revealed the NYC manhole covers were handmade in India. See Natasha Rahejathe’s documentary ‘Cast in India’ as background. https://castinindia.com

[6] Katrina Tyler in conversation with the author

 

Publication Design, Liz Cox, mono : graphic design

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LINDA HUGHES

Monochromatic with just a splash of red?

 

For over a decade Linda has been consumed by stripes in her work. Stripes are very noisy and demanding; impossible to ignore, the stripe wants attention! The jewellery in this collection included monochromatic brooches and pendants. Will sensational red be kept at bay?

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Linda is an arts professional and maker with over 19 years experience as a contemporary art jeweller. Her passion for the graphic motif of the stripe and Renaissance art seem diametrically opposed. However, when she traced the history of the stripe, she was rewarded by a convergence of these subjects. The outcomes of her research were two groups of jewellery, which explored the interplay of their sources. She is currently represented by Studio Ingot, Melbourne.

 

EDUCATION

PhD, Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology, Melbourne

Masters, Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology, Melbourne

Bachelor of Fine Arts (Distinction), Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology, Melbourne

 

SELECT SOLO SHOWS

2018 Allusion Field, Galerie Biró, Munich

2017 Striped Inference, Craft, Melbourne

2016 Metonymy, Phd Exhibition, Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology, Melbourne

2013 The Obscure Stripe, Galerie Biró, Munich

 

COLLECTIONS

> Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology, Melbourne

> National Gallery of Australia, Canberra

> Powerhouse Museum, Sydney

> Musee des Arts Decoratifs, Paris

> Private collections in Australia and overseas

KATRINA TYLER

Form and Colour

 

Katrina's collection continued her current explorations into the sculptural potential of abstracted form, colour, material and juxtapositions found in the industrial landscape near where she lives and works. Playfully interrogating our relationship to industry and commerce, HER materials included copper, brass, silver and enamel paint finishes.

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Katrina is an arts professional and maker with over 19 years experience as a contemporary art jeweller. Her practice spans jewellery, sculpture and public art, with a predominant focus on the materials and techniques of gold and metalsmithing. After completing a Bachelor, and Master of Fine Art in Gold and Silversmithing at RMIT, Katrina was awarded an Artstart Grant which enabled her to pursue public art in China and undertake further experience with welding and larger scale metalwork. Katrina is currently represented by Studio Ingot, Melbourne.

 

EDUCATION

2013 Metal Engineering Fabrication, NMIT

2010 Master of Fine Art, Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology, Melbourne

2004 Bachelor of Fine Arts (Distinction): Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology, Melbourne

 

SELECT SOLO SHOWS

2018 Shapescape, Alternating Current, Melbourne

2017 Container, Trocadero Artspace, Radiant Pavilion, Melbourne

2009 SUB12-Pylon, The Substation, Melbourne

2008 Collect and Cut, Territory Craft, Darwin

 

PUBLIC ARTWORK

2017 Newport Waterside Park, Public Art Commission, UAP for Stockland

2017 Unison Newstead, Public Art Commission, UAP for Mirva

SIM LUTTIN

Materiality, Memory and Time

 

Sim's practice plots a course through time: examining notions of ritual, personal authenticity and materiality. Sim presented wearable jewellery and photographic wall-mounted objects. The scale was intimate and incorporate silver, steel, patina and sublimated aluminium. The new artworks commemorate twenty years of friendship and making.

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Sim is an arts professional, producer, and maker with over 19 years experience as a contemporary art jeweller, craftsperson and artist. While having always been influenced by nature in her work, Sim's current interest is in exploring yearlong time-based projects that respond to the everyday to create extensive conceptual bodies of work. She is currently represented by Pieces of Eight, Melbourne and Charon Kransen Arts, New York.

 

SELECT EDUCATION

2008 Master of Fine Arts (Distinction), Indiana University, Bloomington

2005 Associateship, Career Development Scheme, JamFactory Contemporary Craft and Design, Adelaide

2003 Bachelor of Fine Arts (Distinction), Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology, Melbourne

 

SELECT SOLO & TWO PERSON SHOWS

2017 Keepsake: With Kirrily Hammond, Radiant Pavilion, Bundoora Homestead, Melbourne

2015 It's Always Darkest Just Before Dawn: Radiant Pavilion, Melbourne

2015 It’s Always Darkest Just Before Dawn: Gray Street Workshop, Adelaide

2013 These Moments Existed: Grunwald Gallery, Bloomington

2009 Hint of a Memory: Metalab, Sydney

 

COLLECTIONS

> Gallerie Marzee, Nijmegen

> Bundoora Homestead Art Centre, Melbourne

> Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide

> Private collections in Australia and overseas

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"REMAINING CLOSE FRIENDS, SINCE 1999 WE'VE EACH BUILT NATIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL REPUTATIONS AND WHILE ACKNOWLEDGING OUR WORK IS DIVERSE, WE ARE UNITED IN CREATING INTIMATE HANDMADE OBJECTS THAT ARE ABUNDANT IN CREATIVE INTEGRITY AND DYNAMISM." 

 

LINDA, SIM & KATRINA, 2019

I respectfully acknowledge the Wurundjeri people of the Kulin Nation, the traditional custodians of the land on which I create and exhibit art. I pay my respects to Elders past and present, as well as to all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in the wider Melbourne community and beyond. Indigenous sovereignty has never been ceded. I acknowledge that I work and live on country on which Members and Elders of The Wurundjeri people and their forebears have been custodians for many centuries and on which Aboriginal People have performed age-old ceremonies of celebration, initiation and renewal. I acknowledge their living culture and their unique role in the life of this region.

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